Rothschild bets on the Euro zone Collapse |
Real Alternative. Real News.|Thursday, October 23, 2014
You are here: Home » English » Rothschild bets on the Euro zone Collapse

Rothschild bets on the Euro zone Collapse 

Meanwhile, financial publications forecast a Greece style rescue for Spain.

By LUIS MIRANDA | THE REAL AGENDA | AUGUST 21, 2012

If there was any doubt on anyone’s mind that the Euro zone will collapse, this is the time to change your mind. Not only is the main stream media predicting more financial rescues for EU nations, but one of the most influential bankers from one of the most influential families in Europe has now bet against the recovery of the Euro.

Lord Jacob Rothschild, from the Rothschild banking mob has wager $200 million against the European currency — euro — and with it he is basically expressing his strong belief that the Euro will collapse and so will the euro zone. Lord Rothschild is a member of the dynasty that has, at least in part, ruled the world through powerful banking institutions. It is the same family that has made a killing before, during and after every single major financial crisis by using the asset and power consolidation model first seen when 5 Rothschild children were unleashed around Europe to build and manage the central banking system that rules the planet today.

According to NBC, Lord Jacob, one of the elders of the Rothschild family “has taken the position against the euro through RIT Capital Partners, the 1.9 billion pound investment trust of which he is executive chairman.” The report says that Rothschild’s position on the Euro comes as he sees the currency weakening day after day due to the many problems that European nations face, especially the sovereign debt issue, which are working as separate ailments against the single currency.

Both Italy and Spain have called for “decisive action” from the European Central Bank to curb the current crisis, especially the lack of confidence on those two nations  as their credit worthiness is downgraded by the banker created credit rating agencies. Just as it happened with Greece, Spain is finding it too difficult to pay its debt, and there are now talks emerging about a possible debt forgiving scheme to help beaten up countries remain financially alive. But the government in Brussels has been clear that it will not seek or encourage financial or fiscal amnesty for any nation.

The government in Brussels is the head the banking structure in Europe, where all banking deals are closed for European nations. According to banking sources, the EU government is not contemplating any type of payment forgiveness, because it considers that such action does not produce any revenue while it gives the wrong message about financial responsibility. This is an interesting position to have if one takes into account that the banking institutions are the entities responsible for most of the debt accrued on the debt sheets of the European nations.

Both in Europe and in North America, the rhetoric regarding the real state of the economies has experienced a 360 degree change, even on the main stream press, where both financial experts and teleprompter readers have now confessed that we have been slaves to the banking institutions for a long, long time, and that only a centralized banking entity will have the ability to solve the debt problem.

In an article published yesterday, the Wall Street Journal is assuring the public that Spain will definitely go through a financial rescue the same way that Greece did as the bankers seek to extend the painful economic and financial depression for as long as possible in every nation that belongs to the Euro zone. Editor Mary Anastasia O’Grady said that if the current crisis took too long to be solved, Spain ran the risk of having to be rescued by the central bankers, a scenario widely denied by the Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy.

O’Grady said in her article that Spain needs to become serious about structural changes that she said are necessary to get the economy going, as well as to propose and execute clear policies that promote growth. Spain needs to “liberalize businesses” so that business owners find it attractive to take risks against extreme austerity measures and cuts that the government has implemented, which do not help address “the path of growth.” She added that Spain can recover all the potential it had, but reforms must continue deeply and seriously.

This does not seem to be the scenario envisioned by Lord Rothschild, however, since he has bet big time against the recovery of the Euro. His position contrasts talking points issued by German Chancellor Angela Merkel and European Central Bank head Mario Draghi, who have said they will do whatever it takes to save the euro. But not all euro members necessarily agree with the “whatever it takes” part of their speech as more divisiveness seems to be growing among European leaders about the way things should be done to save — or not — the countries that are unable to paid the banker created debt.

m4s0n501
About the author:

Luis Miranda is the Founder and Editor-in-Chief at The Real Agenda. His career spans over 17 years and almost every form of news media. He attended Montclair State University's School of Broadcasting and also obtained a Bachelor's Degree in Journalism from Universidad Latina de Costa Rica. Luis speaks English, Spanish Portuguese and Italian.

Add a Comment

WP-SpamFree by Pole Position Marketing