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Coca Cola Company wants you to believe there can be a Healthy Coke 

The multinational claims it will use a natural sweetener for diabetics to include in its range of low-calorie products

Coca Cola is preparing to flood the market with a new drink that adds products to reduce calories.

The pseudoscience used by Coke to support such  a claim is based on the premise that what it calls a natural sweetener will be industrialized to then be added to soft drinks and that this new mixture will be perfect for people to consume.

The recent boom in scientific evidence that proves how sugar is to blame for most human disease, included obesity an diabetes has prompted the food industry to cheat customers into believing that labels such as ‘natural’, ‘fat free’ and ‘no calorie’ mean that their products are healthy.

The food industry is moving towards labeling their drinks as ‘low carb’ and ‘low sugar’ products and now Coke is ready to place a new deceiving label: ‘natural sweetener’.

The Coca Cola Company, an American multinational based in Atlanta, Georgia, is preparing to take its deceit a step further and has confirmed that it will launch a “greendrink with 30% less calories by using Stevia, a plant which is used as a natural sweetener for diabetics.

Coke will launch its new drink in France first and later it will introduce it into other European countries.

Europe is well known for its strict regulations when it comes to industrialized food. Some European nations are the strongest opponents of genetically engineered organisms as well as the use of pesticides in food crops.

Stevia is named after Spanish botanist and physician Pedro Jaime Esteve, who first discovered the plant in Paraguayan territory.

Stevia is a green plant that belongs to the Asteraceae family, whose origins lie in the tropical region of South America.

The plant is still found wild in Paraguay, especially in the Amambay region in Argentina and the province of Misiones. It has also been cultivated for decades due to its sweetening properties and negligible calories.

According to several published French media, Coca Cola will launch its new brand in 2015. The name chosen for the new product will be Coke Life” and will allegedly contain 30% less sugar compared to the original drink.

Apparently, “Coke Life” will have 89 calories per 33 cl can instead of the average 139 calories in the traditional cola.

According to media reports, the new Coke version will come dressed in green which will signify the lack of artificial sweeteners or chemicals such as aspartame, Coca Cola claims.

Are there people who still believe in labels and colors?

Coca Cola along with other multinationals have used synthetic sweeteners which have been proven to cause all kinds of health problems, yet we are now to believe that somehow they have come to their senses and want people to drink a healthy product?

They alleged that they goal is to reduce the content of chemical sweeteners that are used for light products, such as the case of aspartame, which has generated controversy in recent years for its proven carcinogenic effect.

“We want to empower ourselves in the field of soft drinkshave said some spokespeople to French media outlets.

Assuming  that the addition of a natural sweetener is true, what can Coke claim for all the other toxic chemicals used in their soft drinks? When will they address their harmful effects?

More importantly, isn’t the Coca Cola Company implicitly accepting it’s guilty of mass poisoning consumers?

About the author: Luis R. Miranda

Luis Miranda is an award-winning journalist and the Founder and Editor of The Real Agenda News. His career spans over 20 years and almost every form of news media. He writes about environmentalism, geopolitics, globalisation, health, corporate control of government, immigration and banking cartels. Luis has worked as a news reporter, On-air personality for Live news programs, script writer, producer and co-producer on broadcast news.

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