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Obama continues to spread lies about Russian Cyberattacks 

Obama

In his sixth visit to Germany as President of the United States, Barack Obama issued a message of “moderate optimism” about the role his successor in the White House, Donald Trump, will have.

Obama justified his opinion in the responsibility that confers to assume the presidency of the country. “It forces you to focus. It requires seriousness,” he said in Berlin.

Next to him was Chancellor Angela Merkel, who reiterated her willingness to cooperate with the future president of the United States “with total conviction.”

As a sign of goodwill toward Washington, Merkel announced her intention to assume greater responsibility in defense. “Germany has understood that message and has begun to react,” she said. Merkel’s statement is another example of what Donald Trump has been able to achieve just by getting elected. He has not stepped into the White House yet, however, the world has begun to adapt to the president-elect.

Obama’s visit has revolutionized central Berlin, whose airspace is closed until Friday. People living in front of the Adlon, the hotel near the Brandenburg Gate, where the US president is staying, are forbidden these days from opening their windows or go out to the balconies.

The security of the current is the most important thing, even more that people’s right to have a normal life. In addition to causing embarrassment to the Berliners, Obama arrives in Germany with a message to the chancellor and other European leaders: Trump’s victory will not change the alliances that the United States has woven in the last 70 years. How would he know that? No one knows.

The president asserted, in his appearance with the chancellor in Berlin, that Russia has participated in cyber attacks, reports Reuters. As many others who accused Russia of attacking the US or influencing the US election, Obama showed no proof whatsoever.

Merkel pledged to him to increase spending on defense. “Germany has understood that message and has begun to react,” she said.

Obama will try to calm the concern of the German authorities, who for now do not know what it will be like to deal with the next American leader.

In Merkel’s government they are unable to discern which of their electoral proclamations will be implemented by Trump and which ones will he left behind in the name of pragmatism.

Obama has tried in recent days to lower the concern by saying that Trump is a pragmatist, not an ideologist. “American democracy is bigger than a single person,” he said Wednesday in Athens.

The US president will still see Merkel over these three days. He did this Wednesday at an impromptu dinner at the Adlon Hotel.

He will meet her again on Thursday, in a bilateral meeting and later dinner in the Foreign Ministry; and will also see her on Friday at a meeting to which the leaders of France, François Hollande; United Kingdom, Theresa May; Italy, Matteo Renzi and Spain’s, Mariano Rajoy will also be present.

In anticipation of this marathon of meetings, Obama granted an interview to the German public channel ARD and the magazine Der Spiegel.

In it he has repeated the usual praises to Merkel. And he also tried to find possible points in agreement with the man who will replace him in the White House, for example in the reform of the health program known as  Obamacare.

“Trump says he wants to improve the health care system. If he can insure the same number of people will be covered, and do it better than me, he will have my support,” he said.

About the author: Luis R. Miranda

Luis Miranda is an award-winning journalist and the Founder and Editor of The Real Agenda News. His career spans over 20 years and almost every form of news media. He writes about environmentalism, geopolitics, globalisation, health, corporate control of government, immigration and banking cartels. Luis has worked as a news reporter, On-air personality for Live news programs, script writer, producer and co-producer on broadcast news.

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