The Islamic State used weapons that were manufactured and designed in more than two dozen countries.

The world already knows that the Islamic State is a creation of the West to justify its military presence in the Middle East, Asia and Northern Africa. It is also well-known that the United States and its proxy terrorist actors in those regions aid ISIS with training and weapons.

The U.S. government itself airdropped weapons and munition to ISIS in Iraq and Syria and helped move weaponry from Libya to Syria during and after the fall of Muammar Gaddafi. However, for some reason that is not clear, the mainstream media continues to say that no one really knows how ISIS fighters get their hands on modern weaponry, Toyota Hilux pick ups trucks and other materials and equipment.

Most mainstream media say that poor regulation of the flow of weapons into Iraq for decades and lack of control over the land have provided the Islamic State with its arsenal, whic it then uses to commit war crimes and crimes against humanity in Iraq and Syria.

Not even Amnesty International, an organization that has supposedly made a name for denouncing complicity in the commission of crimes, fully describes the ways in which ISIS has been supported by western backers.

Amnesty International’s lack of reliable data is apparent in its recently published report ‘Taking stock. Arming the Islamic State ‘.

From the “expert analysis” completed and compiled in “thousands of videos and verified images”, the report explains, shows how the fighters of the Islamic State used weapons that were manufactured and designed in more than two dozen countries, including Russia, China, United States and countries EU. The jihadists got these weapons stockpile mostly from the Iraqi army in Mosul.

“The large and varied range of weapons being used by the armed group calling itself the Islamic State is a textbook case of how the irresponsible arms trade gives fuel to the perpetration of atrocities on a massive scale,” said Patrick Wilcken, researcher of Weapons Control, Security Trade and Human Rights at Amnesty International.

“The poor regulation and lack of oversight of the huge flows of arms to Iraq in recent decades have led to the Islamic State and other armed groups to achieve an excellent situation unprecedented access to the firepower.” There is no explicit mention of military aid sent by the US and its allies in the region.

After the fall of Mosul in June 2014, the jihadists were “unexpectedly left with an internationally manufactured weapons arsenal” of the Iraqi army, including weapons and military vehicles produced in the United States which they use to control other parts of the country, with devastating consequences for civilians.

We believe that unexpectedly is not a good choice of words to describe how ISIS and other terrorist groups ended up with formidable weaponry and equipment.

When a country is destabilized from the inside and the outside, weapons used to murder innocent people are very likely to fall in the hands of terrorists; especially when the country’s official army is disbanded because of the actions of foreign aggressors, as it was the case with Iraq.

The variety and breadth of the Islamic State’s arsenal reflects decades of irresponsible arms transfers to Iraq, says AI. The organization fails to point out who are the parties responsible for such a transfer of weapons.

The consequences of providing weapons to terrorists has been exacerbated by various failures to manage arms imports and implement mechanisms to prevent misuses during the US-led occupation since 2003.

This problem of lax controls on military arsenals and endemic corruption of successive Iraqi governments is added, says the organization.

Among the advanced weapons available to the Islamic state there are portable air defense systems, anti-tank guided missiles and armored fighting vehicles, assault rifles like the AK series, made in Russia, the M16 and the American Bushmaster.

Most conventional weapons used by fighters of the Islamic State date from between 1970 and 1990, and include pistols, revolvers and other small arms, machine guns, anti-tank weapons, mortars and artillery.

Kalashnikov rifles are a common type of the era of the Soviet Union, especially from Russian and Chinese manufacturers.

The fighters of the Islamic State and other armed groups have also resorted to making their own rudimentary weapons such as mortars and rocket launchers, improvised hand grenades, explosive devices, car bombs and booby traps, and even reused cluster munitions, a weapon that is prohibited worldwide.

In some cases, explosive devices are landmines which are banned by the Convention on the Prohibition of Antipersonnel Mines.

Amnesty International calls on all States to adopt a total embargo on the Syrian government forces as well as armed opposition groups who have committed war crimes and crimes against humanity.

This call by AI also shows their lack of knowledge about the dimension of the conflict.

Disarming the Syrian Army and letting western instigators arm the terrorist groups would be a death sentence for Syria as a nation.

The report calls for the international community, that abstract entity by which all nations abide, but that no one knows who it really is, to adopt a standard of “presumption of denial” of arms exports to Iraq, meaning it could only be done after a strict risk assessment. In other words, Amnesty International is not really against sending arms to Iraq, it is only opposed to it when western organizations that are credible to them, say that the transfer has been vetted.

Army units or Iraqi police, with exceptions, must first show that they are respectful and consistent with international humanitarian law and human rights and who have the necessary control mechanisms to ensure that weapons are not diverted to armed groups. AI representatives who worked on the latest report forgot that there is no army in Iraq and that police are bought and paid for by war lords and western-backed groups.

AI sais that any State which is considering a transfer of arms to armed forces in Iraq must first make a solid investment in pre- and post-delivery checks, as well as training and monitoring that meet international standards for the management and use of such weapons.

Amnesty International calls on all states that have not yet signed the Arms Trade Treaty to adhere to the UN document.

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