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Republicans and Democrats Reject the Status Quo 


Republicans

New Hampshire does not decide the general election, but it is one of the states that signals who will be in the run up until november.

Another key fact that the primaries have shown is that both Republicans and Democrats have said enough is enough to the governing establishment. People from both parties have said that they do not want to keep things as they are. They have to change a lot.

The two candidates who challenge the political status quo in the United States, Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump, have swept the primaries in New Hampshire, and in doing so, they have shaken both parties to the core.

The Trump and Sanders victories are significant not because they beat Bush and Clinton, but because they reveal the degree of discontent that has curdled in US society.

Sanders has beaten Hillary Clinton with a lead of more than twenty points. Donald Trump, a foreign policy real estate magnate, won with 18 points ahead of its closest rival, the governor of Ohio, John Kasich.

The emergence of John Kasich was the novelty of the night. In the Republican field there is an expectation to see whether the allegedly centrist candidate can beat Donald Trump in future primaries and caucuses or if Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz will gain the ground they have lost in just one week.

Last week, following the results of Iowa, it seemed to be Marco Rubio the man who was at the head of the Republican pack, but the senator crashed in the last debate, and had been ranked fifth in New Hampshire polls before the voting began.

Now the great white hope is John Kasich, which is arguably the least conservative of the conservatives.

New Hampshire primaries forced a humbling experience onto Hillary Clinton, who appaeared to be happy after her opponent, the socialist Bernie Sanders, was declared the winner of the New Hampshire primaries and who now has won more delegates than her.

Clinton is missing what her husband and the Bush dynasty always had: large masses of ignorant followers who did not care about having the same families as always, be it a Clinton or a Bush, in control of political power.

The results in Iowa and New Hampshire demand that Clinton makes a drastic change in strategy that could only be by a shift to the left, where Sanders is leading over her in every social group.

Sanders is now perceived as the lesser of two evils. Still, the Clinton problem lies more in its path and name than in her proposals, which by the way, no one knows what they are.

Hillary has surrounded herself with extreme feminists who want people to vote for Clinton because she’s a woman a not much more.

The third important piece of the New Hampshire primary is the battle of Republicans losers.

Kasich, who won 16.4% of the vote, defeated his immediate followers by five points. After Kasich, Republicans voted for Mr. PsyOP, Ted Cruz who was in a virtual tie with Florida Governor Jeb Bush who got 11% of the votes.

In fourth place came Marco Rubio with 10.5% who, as we pointed out, collapsed in the polls in just a week and seems to be the next candidate to pull out of the race after Chris Christie and Carli Fiorina withdrew their candidacies on Wednesday.

Rubio’s bad performace in the last debate cost him his second place in the polls, and it is likely that it will cost him the nomination as well. It is just a matter of time.

Another candidate whose performance has been sub par, especially when compared to his brother and father, is Jeb Bush, who has consistently polled at less than 10% since he began his run for the nomination.

New Hampshire was the first time his numbers surpassed the single digits. Bush’s problem is greater than Rubio’s or Cruz’s, because he has not been the recipient of significant amounts of money from the SuperPACs.

Should Bush fail to win South Carolina with clarity he may be the next candidate to ‘suspend’ his campaign until further review.

The next contest will be in South Carolina where it is likely to be another Trump win in the Republican Party and another tight outcome for the Democratic candidates.

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About the author: Luis R. Miranda

Luis R. Miranda is an award-winning journalist and the founder & editor of The Real Agenda News. His career spans over 23 years in every form of news media. He writes about environmentalism, education, technology, science, health, immigration and other current affairs. Luis has worked as on-air talent, news reporter, television producer, and news writer.

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